Guest Post: Deposition of Datasets and DSpace

This guest post is authored by Annette Ramsden, Assistant Academic Librarian, University of Abertay. As announced last week, during October 2011 the RSP sponsored ten UK repository staff  ‘buddy visits’ as part of our Open Access Week initiative. Further information available from here. Annette visited the Edinburgh University Data Library.

Theme: Repository best practice and management

One of the areas of interest to me as manager of Abertay Research Collections is the potential to utilise our repository for deposition of datasets. Currently it is publications only, but the possibility of expansion into dataset deposition had been raised. As funders are increasingly requiring that data is available to a wider audience, institutional repositories can potentially meet this need. Therefore I welcomed the opportunity as part of the RSP ‘buddy’ project to visit Edinburgh University Data Library to discuss with Data Manager Robin Rice and Associate Data Librarian Stuart Macdonald how they dealt with data, as they also utilise D-Space software. It was a really fruitful meeting as we discussed how the software had been customised to meet the needs of the Data Library requirements. Although Edinburgh have separate data repository Edinburgh DataShare  and publications repository (ERA) which has allowed them to customise their metadata fields and deposition process to reflect data deposition content rather than publications, it was useful to see how their processes worked. The meeting raised a number of areas for consideration and of future exploration which I am sure are those being considered and addressed by the rest of the community; in no particular order:

  • Ensuring protocols/procedures for deposition are created and are robust
  • Addressing focus of deposition: is it purely for preservation/curation post- research, or for ongoing deposition as research is completed
  • Ensuring high-quality documentation and clear methodology instructions are provided by depositor along with raw data
  • Rights statements/attribution licencing
  • Issues of licencing for re-usage, whether Creative Commons, Science Commons, Open Data Commons attribution, or any other?
  • Citation fields for correct referencing of data when re-utilised
  • Processes in place to deal with multiple formats
  • Ensuring that confidentiality/commercially sensitive material is appropriately dealt with by depositors
  • Whether datasets should be entirely open-access or whether embargo process/restricted access would be required in some cases
  • Storage issues due to potential size of datasets and limitations of existing storage areas
  • Whether linkage between raw data and articles derived from data could be achieved
  • Ensuring that version control applies to datasets, whether processes are in place to supersede or provide linkage between unique identifiers of related datasets

Meeting Robin and Stuart and being able to discuss the issues that I had considered pertinent and also ones that I hadn’t, was rewarding. It has given me a great deal to consider and investigate further and I would like to thank them for giving up their time and being so hospitable.

Author: Annette Ramsden, Assistant Academic Librarian, University of Abertay.

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